Buyer Beware: A few basics before buying pet meds online

. December 1, 2017.
pet-medicine

Having survived Black Friday, we are now in the heart of the holiday shopping season. While the malls are sure to be busy, many will be burning up the internet with online shopping. It’s easy and convenient to fill our carts from the comfort of our couches, but let’s take a moment to address buying veterinary drugs and supplies from online sources and big box stores.

Relationships are critical for pet care

The veterinary client-patient-doctor relationship is critical to the overall well-being of your pet. A complete medical record for each pet enables the doctor to know all treatments that have or are being given to their patient. When you bypass your vet, you may save a few dollars but you create a void in the pet’s medical record. Most of the primary veterinary pharmaceutical companies do not sell their products to online pharmacies, big box stores or other non-veterinary outlets. These companies will only support products sold by a veterinarian.

For example, Zoetis, a global animal health company, has a policy ” to sell our prescription medications for dogs and cats exclusively to licensed veterinarians.” There has been a serious problem with counterfeit products being sold to trusting and unsuspecting pet owners. Learn more about this at fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/ResourcesforYou. At Sylvania Vet, we have a copy of the Zoetis letter regarding non-veterinary selling of prescription products – just stop in and ask and we’d be happy to share it with you!

Inspected and certified

Inspections of the three area AAHA-certified hospitals occurred late last month. SylvaniaVET has had a triennual inspection and certification since 1978. If a vet practice is not certified by the American Animal Hospital Association then they are never inspected by any organization for meeting even minimal standards of care. Yes, you read that right! The State of Ohio does not inspect veterinary practices. AAHA hospitals meet over 900 criteria of excellence in providing patient care and client service.

FEAR FREE MOMENT FOR YOUR PET:
Bring your dog to their visit hungry and feed its meal from a baggie of food while you travel and wait for the exam. Play quiet or classical music on the radio. Ask about using Adaptil for your dog who stresses when traveling or visiting the vet, kennel, groomer or trainer.

Trending

January Home Maintenance

By Lisa Alleman Add these home maintenance tips to your 2021 Resolutions The holidays are behind us once again along with December’s flurry of activity and family focus. As we begin another year, the care of our homes is a worthwhile focus. These January Home Maintenance tips will help you start the year out right!

2021 Resolutions: Planning for the world after 2020

    A worldwide pandemic, a contentious national election and a renewed examination of racism in America, accompanied by hurricanes, fires and even murder hornets, made 2020 a once-in-a-lifetime year.  “The hardest thing for people to get used to in 2020 was the lack of predictability,” explained Matt Rizzo, CEO and president of A Renewed

RESTAURANTS OFFERING HEALTHY OPTIONS Need to take off five pounds after the holidays? 

  Happy New Year!  Did you eat your way through the holidays?  Need or want to shed a few pounds?  Still want to enjoy restaurant fare?  Diets and restaurants are not necessarily incompatible.  The USDA gives these tips for making healthy choices at restaurants.  Drink water, split  meals, pick salads full of vegetables with dressing

Who is this person taking care of me? Local health systems utilize ‘hospitalist’ approach

by Jason Webber Dr. Steven Zook is a hometown product and a University of Toledo School of Medicine graduate who works at ProMedica Toledo Hospital. He’s also a member of what has been called “the fastest growing specialty in the history of modern medicine”—hospitalists. What is a hospitalist? Coined in 1996, the term “hospitalist” is