Most American Adults Get Enough Vitamin D Without Supplements

. January 31, 2019.
Vitamin D Supplements

DEAR MAYO CLINIC:

It seems that vitamin D is always in the news. Why is it so important, and does the average person need a vitamin D supplement?

ANSWER:

Vitamin D is an essential nutrient that your body requires primarily to build strong bones. It does this by helping your body absorb and maintain adequate levels of two other nutrients important to bone health – calcium and phosphate.

You get most of your vitamin D from sunlight. When ultraviolet (UV) rays hit your skin – particularly midday – it triggers production of vitamin D. People in climates with more sunlight tend to get more exposure than do those in climates with less sunlight.

Certain foods – fortified foods, such as milk and cereal, and fatty fish, such as salmon, tuna and mackerel – also provide vitamin D. Chemical reactions in your liver and kidneys transform vitamin D into forms that your body can use.

In general, adults should consume 600 international units of vitamin D a day. That goes up to 800 international units a day for those over 70. National survey data indicate that most Americans don’t get enough vitamin D through their diets. However, the data also indicate that average blood levels of vitamin D are above what’s considered necessary for good bone health. This implies that most American adults get enough vitamin D – most likely through sun exposure.

Deficiency disorders

Severe and prolonged vitamin D deficiency is known to cause bone mineralization disorders such as rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Conditions such as these can lead to soft bones, aching muscles, painful movement and fractures. Vitamin D deficiency also may contribute to osteoporosis.

Although numerous studies have reported results associating vitamin D deficiency with various other diseases and conditions – such as fatigue, depression, chronic pain, heart disease, autoimmune disorders, infections, metabolic issues and cancer – clinical trials of vitamin D supplements in people with these conditions generally have failed to show benefit. This implies that a lack of vitamin D probably isn’t causing these conditions. Some experts argue that rather than being a cause of these kinds of illnesses, vitamin D deficiency may be a biological marker for them, signaling the presence of inflammatory processes related to the disease or condition.

(Mayo clinic q & a is an educational resource and doesn’t replace regular medical care.
For more information, visit www.Mayoclinic.Org.)
(C) 2018 mayo foundation for medical education and research.
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