Crab Pasta

. September 3, 2020.

I found this recipe in Bon Appetit magazine.  It looked good but maybe a bit boring.  I loved the idea of  pasta with egg yolks and crab on a hot summer night. I altered the recipe by making my own pasta, adding jarred artichokes, toasted pine nuts, red pepper flakes and frozen peas.  I went heavy with the garlic, lemon and chives.

The final product was delicious. My husband and dinner guests loved the flavors and texture.

  • 12 oz. uncooked bucatini pasta (I made fresh linguini)
  • ½ C. olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • 2T. finely chopped garlic
  • ¼ C. drained and rinsed capers, chopped.  (I used ½ C. Caperberries)
  • 1 C. peas (fresh or frozen)
  • small jar artichokes (packed in water), roughly chopped
  • 1 t. coarsely ground black pepper
  • 1 t. red pepper flakes
  • 6 LG. egg yolks (Make meringue with the whites for dessert)
  • 3 oz. pecorino cheese plus more for garnish
  • ½ C. thinly sliced chives
  • 8 oz. fresh crab meat (I used canned blue crab)
  • ¼ C. toasted pine nuts
  • 1 T. grated lemon zest, plus 1 T. fresh lemon juice (I used the juice from ½ lemon)
  • sea or kosher salt, to taste 
  • lemon wedges for serving
  • Boil pasta in well-salted water until very al dente.  Reserve 1 ½ C cooking water. Drain in a colander.  Drizzle with a small splash of olive oil.
  1. Cook garlic in oil in a large, deep skillet over medium, stirring often until lightly toasted. 
  2. Add capers, black pepper, red pepper flakes, peas and artichokes and cook for a couple of minutes.  
  3. Add  1 C. reserved pasta water and bring to a boil over medium heat.
  4. Add pasta and return to a boil until pasta is al dente. Add another ¼ cooking water if needed.
  5. Remove from heat.
  6. Quickly add egg yolks, stirring vigorously until creamy, about 10 seconds.
  7. Add cheese, pine nuts and chives; stir.
  8. Add crab, pine nuts, zest, lemon juice, salt and more cooking water if too thick.
  9. Serve with lemon wedges

Recipe adapted from Bon Appetit.

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