Recipe Of The Week – Lamb Keema

A few years ago, I decided to teach myself how to make Indian food.  I so love the flavors and wanted to figure out the complexities of curries and other Indian dishes.  As I do with all my cooking, I plunged in, without blinders, and started trying different recipes I found in cookbooks and online.

Generally, I had no idea what most recipes would taste like because I was unfamiliar with the seasonings, techniques and names of Indian dishes.  If something about the recipe interested me, I just made it!  Everything I made was good.  Some recipes were far better than others.

Initially, preparing Indian food was an investment in seasonings.  I’ve attached a photograph of the many different components for one recipe I made.  Obviously, this was not a “four-ingredient” recipe that is the rage for many home cooks.  I did learn the seasonings are far less expensive at the ethnic groceries and an added benefit of shopping for ingredients in local ethnic groceries is the help offered by other shoppers and the owner-operators.  People like sharing their culture and what better way is there than through food?

 

pasted image 0 (18)

I have learned techniques by reading, videos and trial and error.  It has been and continues to be a fun experiment.  While I still have loads to learn, I am confident in making Indian food and do prepare it frequently.

I have learned techniques by reading, videos and trial and error.  It has been and continues to be a fun experiment.  While I still have loads to learn, I am confident in making Indian food and do prepare it frequently.

 

I want to share something I have made and which will not break the bank.  I hope you try this recipe for Lamb Keema and enjoy the end result and process of it as much as I do.

LAMB KEEMA

(recipe is from https://bestrecipesuk.com)

Italics – my comments on the recipe

  • oil (vegetable, sunflower, not olive)
  • 2  onions (peeled & chopped)
  • 6  whole cloves 
  • 1 inch  cinnamon stick 
  • 6  whole black peppercorns 
  • 1 tbsp garam masala 
  • 1 tsp turmeric 
  • 14.5 oz can chopped tomatoes 
  • 5  garlic cloves (peeled & crushed)
  • 2 inches  fresh root ginger (peeled & grated)(break off a piece at the grocery and pay only what you need!)
  • 2 – 4  red chillies (deseeded & chopped – depending on heat preference) (can use jalapeno instead)
  • 1 Lb ground lamb 
  • 3.5 oz frozen peas 
  •  sea salt (for seasoning) (kosher salt is ok)

Instructions

    • Step 1
    • Place the cumin and coriander seeds into a dry frying pan and roast until fragrant and then grind in a pestle and mortar. (can use a coffee bean grinder – just wipe it out before and after!)
    • Step 2
    • Place the oil and butter into a large pan and melt and then add the onion, cloves, cinnamon and peppercorns over a medium heat until the onions are browned. Remove the cinnamon stick and add the cumin and coriander mix with the garam masala and turmeric and fry for 30 seconds whilst stirring. (the aroma is divine.)
    • Step 3
    • Add the tomatoes, garlic, ginger and chillies. Cook the mixture over a medium heat for 10 minutes.
    • Step 4
    • Add the lamb and mix into the mixture breaking up the lamb. Cover with a lid and simmer on a low heat for 35-45 minutes. Add the peas 10 minutes before the end. Season with salt and add more garam masala if required.
    • Step 5
    • This dish is best when it is cooled and reheated to allow the flavours to infuse. Reheat in the pan and serve with basmati rice and Indian breads. Enjoy!

 

  • (serve with more peppers and/or cayenne pepper for more heat)
  • (if too hot, add a dollop of plain yogurt.)

 

 

 

Comments

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Similar Articles

Instagram

Most Popular

Where Does the Money Go? How We Save, Where We Spend

As much as we hate to admit it, money is one of the driving forces in our lives. We spend a lot of time...

Glenlore Trails Returns with The Haunted Forest

By Katie Friedman The veil between worlds has lifted, the ghosts and ghouls have come out to play, and a thrilling journey is in store...

Great Lakes Museum presents exhibit on pre-Revolutionary disaster

On October 18, 1764, a British colonel named John Bradstreet was sailing Lake Erie with 60 boats and 9 canoes, returning from an effort...