Humor in hardship

. January 12, 2015.
good-people

Good People at Village Players by Emily Remaklus People love to watch people. Good People is nothing like the over-the-top drama found in reality shows; it is realistic, with relatable situations and characters. Written by Pulitzer-winning author David Lindsay-Abaire, the play premiered on Broadway in 2011. Since then, the contemporary play has been produced across the country and overseas. Good People is set in Boston, and revolves around the story of single mother Margaret Walsh, who is living paycheck to paycheck while trying to care for her handicapped adult daughter. When she loses her job and faces eviction, she decides that visiting her ex-boyfriend, Mike—a wealthy doctor whom she hasn’t seen since high school—might be a good idea. She originally intends on visiting him in hopes that he can find her a job, but when no job opportunities are available, she decides her only chance out of poverty is to claim Mike as the father of her daughter. This story may sound like that of a desperate woman, which it is, but like its title implies, it shines a light on the goodness of people and gives a glimpse of hope for the future. Through tough times Good People’s subject matter is often associated with pity and sadness, but Director Derek Hansen claims that the play “is meant to be a comedy,” and that he has advised the actors to find humor, “even in the morose parts” of the show. Though all characters are strongly written, the role of Margie (played by Trish Tavernier) is particularly complex. “She’s strong, cunning, witty…but there are also moments where her faults are showcased as well. In the end, the audiences may be conflicted as to whether she made the right decisions, but will ultimately be intrigued by her,” Hansen said. Audiences may be left thinking about Margie and her choices, but hopefully, they will also take away a poignant message.  “Never judge,” Hansen said. “I believe we’re all one bad decision or unfortunate circumstance away from being completely destitute. It can happen to anyone…I believe we can all relate to the play’s subject matter. That’s the strength of this show,” he said. See Good People  Friday, January 9 until January 24. Tickets here or 419-472-6817. Village Players Theatre, 2740 Upton Ave.

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