The Cinnamon Stick— more than pie

. June 30, 2018.
straw-rhu-pie

When a restaurant flips the script and introduces a new concept, the transition may lead to a question— was the change a reconsideration or a continuation of previous plans? In the case of The Cinnamon Stick, which began as a pie bakery, the addition of a full breakfast, lunch and dinner menu doesn’t feel, or taste, like an afterthought.

First course

When The Cinnamon Stick opened in February 2017, they started with dessert. Originally planned as a bakery and cafe, the cozy Sylvania confectionary offered handmade fruit and cream pies, ice cream, espresso drinks, along with a host of baked goods.

Patrons flocked in for the pies in a variety of flavors, from classics like Apple and Peach, to more unique selections, like Buckeye Cream. Despite being flakey and delicious, carefully-crafted pies were only part of what customers loved when the bakery opened. Folks coming off the University/Parks Bike Trail— a few feet away from the bakery— savored ice cream cones. Couples stopped in to share a slice of pie and a cup of coffee after dinner. Families picked up pie made-to-order, were tempted by decorated cookies and special pastries.

It didn’t take long until The Cinnamon Stick realized that, despite their pies, customers were excited for more. So six months after opening, in September 2017, they rolled out a menu featuring sandwiches and other lunchtime favorites.

More options

Customers sampled the diner classics and The Stick found that everyone wanted more, and they weren’t shy about asking. Based on customers’ requests, the bakery added to the menu. When they added breakfast, they realized they were perceived less as a bakery and more as a diner.

Today, The Cinnamon Stick offers breakfast all day long, featuring omelets, pancakes and traditional plates with eggs and potatoes. Maintaining its roots as a bakery, The Stick continues serving up warm cinnamon rolls, doughnuts, and quiches made with their flakey crust. Diners can also enjoy burgers, sandwich melts, subs, salads, gyros, and other classic American diner options. Even the prices are traditional — everything is $7 or less.

inside-cinamon

Comfort food

This tastes-like-home bakery offers familiar comforts of a family kitchen. Settling at a table in the dining area, we picked up a board game from the table. The fresh chicken pot pies and open face roast beef sandwich with mashed potatoes were appealing but the bacon cheeseburger and grilled chicken sandwich— only six dollars each— won our order. The portion matched the price, modest but filling, with a satisfying taste.

No trip to The Cinnamon Stick is complete without a slice of pie. After careful deliberation, we decided on slices of the Pecan and the Peach-Raspberry Pies. Despite being full from our meal, we chose a few items from the bakery cases to take home. While we don’t typically succumb to sweets, sweet additions are a specialty at The Cinnamon Stick.

7am-8pm | daily
3535 N. Holland Sylvania Rd
419-843-9127 | facebook.com/thecinnamonsticksylvania

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